Category: Law and Society

society

The ‘Income Management’ Disgrace: Confessions of a Welfare Dependent

Brace yourselves fellow law school colleagues. It might come as a shock to some of you when I proudly confess that I have been, and always will be, welfare dependent. I was raised by a single mother of three in the Collingwood Commission high-rise apartments. Our brave mother, who migrated from Turkey when she was…




mockingbird

Trial by ‘Doctored’ Peers: Preventing Prosecutorial Jury Stacking

Since reading Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird in high school, I’ve always been fascinated by the jury system. The fictional champion Atticus Finch taught me at a very early age that ‘a court is only as sound as its jury, and a jury is only as sound as the [people] who make it up’.[1] Our jury…




sexting2

‘Sexting’ Laws in Victoria: Distinguishing Child Pornography from High-Tech Flirtation

Back when I was in primary school, our lunchtimes occasionally consisted of playing ‘kiss chasey’ – a game of tag by mode of kissing. I was never the popular kid in the schoolyard and on the rare occasion where I had been kissed or selected to start the game I remember most girls would run…




DNA

DNA Evidence and Familial Matching

“THE son shall not bear the iniquity of the father, neither shall the father bear the iniquity of the son.”[1] Regardless of your religious affiliations, the relentless progress of modern DNA science has the capacity to challenge and undermine this immensely sensible and vital moral, philosophical and legal foundation. DNA familial matching is the process…




juvenile-prison

The Toxicity of Juvenile Imprisonment: Mandatory Sentencing in Victoria

It’s been five years since I completed work experience as a Youth Worker at the Juvenile Justice Centre, supervising male offenders between the ages of 15-20 in the Youth Training facility. Being exposed to the toxicity behind the prison walls made me appreciate why the Children’s Court is legislated to reserve incarceration as an absolute…




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‘Get a Fire in Your Belly’ for Indigenous Rights!

‘Get a fire in your belly’ was Jill Prior’s powerful message from the Victorian Aboriginal Legal Service when she recently provided a moving presentation at the Progressive Law Network’s Legal (r)Evolution conference. It has been 20 years since the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths In Custody made its 339 recommendations to essentially jam the revolving doors of our criminal…